8 Common Mistakes in the Co-Founder Search

You can't throw a stone in the startup community without hitting a blog post, tweet, or discussion around co-founders.  While I think there's a great deal of good advice out there on the search for a co-founder on places like Venture Hacks, Humbled MBA and OnStartups, it's as important to understand the potholes to avoid.  Just like a pothole will disable an otherwise great car, these mistakes will derail your company...and your cofounder search.

How to Build Credibility as a Business Co-Founder

How do you attract a technical cofounder? What does it take to be a good business cofounder? How do you get your idea off the ground and make some progress without spending a lot of time coding? These are all questions a Northeastern student emailed me about earlier this week. 

So what can you do? Luckily, in the world of the web today, there are many tools, tips and tricks out there that can help.

The Boston Startup Guide - Part II: Finding Mentors

We all get them. Those emails that make you cringe, just a little.  Some brand new entrepreneur emails you for help. You're busy and you're not sure you're the right person to help. They seem like they lack even some of the most basic knowledge to get started.  But they're asking you for help...probably hoping for a meeting or maybe an intro to a trusted contact.

In Boston, we have a habit of just wanting to click the delete button on such messages, or simply declining citing a desire to "focus on my startup" right now or just not being "the right person." We can do better than that. If you really can't take the meeting, let's leave each of these new entrepreneurs pointed in the right direction. The Boston Startup Guide is here to help you do that. 

In Part II, we're covering what to do when a new entrepreneur is looking for mentors and you can't help them yourself.  There are great things you can point them to and we're going to share them with you so you can copy and paste them in your next message, so you can say still help them even if you can't take that meeting. 

The Boston Startup Guide - Part I: When New Entrepreneurs Want Funding

We all get them. Those emails that make you cringe, just a little.  Some brand new entrepreneur emails you for help. You're busy and you're not sure you're the right person to help. They seem like they lack even some of the most basic knowledge to get started.  But they're asking you for help...probably hoping for a meeting or maybe an intro to a trusted contact.

In Boston, we have a habit of just wanting to click the delete button on such messages, or simply declining citing a desire to "focus on my startup" right now or just not being "the right person." We can do better than that. If you really can't take the meeting, let's leave each of these new entrepreneurs pointed in the right direction. The Boston Startup Guide is here to help you do that. 

In Part I, we're covering what to do when a new entrepreneur is looking for funding and is likely not really ready for funding.  There are great things you can point them to and we're going to share them with you so you can copy and paste them in your next message, so you can say still help them even if you can't take that meeting. 

Young Hustlers Series: Janet Aronica of oneforty

In this ongoing economic recession and "jobless recovery" Gen Y has drawn the short straw.  As reported recently in the New York Times, “the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is a whopping 17.6 percent.” Adding to this is the bad reputation for being self-entitled and difficult to work with.  Like any stereotype, there's always some truth that started it, but it's unfair to paint an entire generation with such a wide brush.

There are many great Gen Y'ers, some right here in our startup scene. They've accepted the challenge of our economic times and blazed their own trail through bold moves. The Young Hustlers series will highlight them.

Today we have Janet Aronica of oneforty, who used the power of social media and a whatever-it-takes attitude, to secure a job in the heart of the recession.  Read on... 

 

Young Hustlers Series: Galen Frechette of Gemvara

In this ongoing economic recession and "jobless recovery" Gen Y has drawn the short straw.  As reported recently in the New York Times, “the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is a whopping 17.6 percent.” Adding to this is the bad reputation for being self-entitled and difficult to work with.  Like any stereotype, there's always some truth that started it, but it's unfair to paint an entire generation with such a wide brush.

There are many great Gen Y'ers, some right here in our startup scene. They've accepted the challenge of our economic times and blazed their own trail through bold moves. The Young Hustlers series will highlight them.

Today we have Galen Frechette, an aspiring entrepreneur who worked to deliver pizzas until he had enough money saved to take a chance in Boston trying to find a great job. Read on...

Young Hustlers Series: Jason Evanish of Greenhorn Connect

In this ongoing economic recession and "jobless recovery" Gen Y has drawn the short straw.  As reported recently in the New York Times, “the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is a whopping 17.6 percent.” Adding to this is the bad reputation for being self-entitled and difficult to work with.  Like any stereotype, there's always some truth that started it, but it's unfair to paint an entire generation with such a wide brush.

There are many great Gen Y'ers, some right here in our startup scene. They've accepted the challenge of our economic times and blazed their own trail through bold moves. The Young Hustlers series will highlight them.

Today, I'm sharing my story. Many of you know me now, but how I got here is far from conventional. Despite this fact, I think everything I did is very repeatable if you want to blaze your own unique trail in our community. Read on...

Young Hustlers Series: Elisabeth Michaud of Communispace

In this ongoing economic recession and "jobless recovery" Gen Y has drawn the short straw.  As reported recently in the New York Times, “the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is a whopping 17.6 percent.” Adding to this is the bad reputation for being self-entitled and difficult to work with.  Like any stereotype, there's always some truth that started it, but it's unfair to paint an entire generation with such a wide brush.

There are many great Gen Y'ers, some right here in our startup scene. They've accepted the challenge of our economic times and blazed their own trail through bold moves. The Young Hustlers series will highlight them.

Today, we have Elisabeth Michaud. As a Harvard graduate in 2009, she thought it would be easy, but her prestigious degree brought no guarantees of a job post graduation.  Through hard work and determination she created opportunity for herself. Read on...

Lessons Learned from Angel Bootcamp

Yesterday was the second annual Angel Bootcamp in Boston. It brought many of the best and brightest investors out to share their knowledge and experience on angel investing.  It also brought out quite a few great entrepreneurs as this year's move to the Tang center allowed for more attendees than the previous year.  Many notables like Bijan, Dharmesh, and Ty Danco shared their thoughts on Angel investing. I'd like to share a few of the key takeaways I saw.

The New Rules for Tech Startups

Saturday's RamenCamp was an amazing day of passionate speakers and entrepreneurs. Whether it was Seth Lieberman laying the smack down talking about "SteakCamp" and "square pegs & round holes" or David Hauser inspiring everyone with the story of Grasshopper and the importance of culture, every speaker shared important lessons and sage advice for really building a business.

It was truly inspiring to see so many people excited about not just starting a company, but letting go of the, "I need investment to do this" mantra. With all of this coming together yesterday and a Bolt Bus trip to NYC giving me time to reflect, I want to share my thoughts on building a company in this climate as I set out to start my next company.

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